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Gomez feeling good after first rehab game

Gomez feeling good after first rehab game

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Gomez feeling good after first rehab game
GRAND CHUTE, Wis. -- Brewers outfielder Carlos Gomez is on a rehab assignment with Class A Wisconsin while he recovers from a strained left hamstring, which occurred on May 4 in San Francisco. Gomez has needed to go on a rehab assignment with Wisconsin in each of his first three seasons with the Brewers.

In 2010, Gomez was placed on the DL in early May with a strained left rotator cuff. In 2011, Gomez, who had been on the DL since late July with a fractured left clavicle, came to Wisconsin from Aug. 27-30. Being here for a third straight year doesn't bother him, as he understands it's part of baseball.

"It's part of the game, it's nothing I can control," Gomez said. "When you get hurt playing the game the right way, the way it's supposed to be played, you have to do the best you can."

Gomez, playing his first of what is expected to be four games for the Timber Rattlers on Wednesday, said he felt good after his first live-game action in 12 days.

"I feel good. I'm not at 100 percent, but I feel good. I ran around a little bit. I ran to first, first to third, and then scored on a fly ball. I'm close to 100 percent."

In his first at-bat, Gomez saw six pitches and reached base after grounding into a fielder's choice. Gomez went from first base to third on Jason Rogers's single, then scored on Nick Ramirez's sacrifice fly to left field.

In his second at-bat, Gomez came to the plate with two outs and the bases loaded. After falling behind, 0-2, he took ball one, then flew out to right field to end the second inning. In his final at-bat of the night, Gomez led off the fifth inning with a strikeout.

In the field, Gomez saw action early, but not often. Two of the first three batters in the first flew out to center field, but he didn't see any action in the field after that.

Gomez didn't see this as an opportunity to just rehab his hamstring, but also to give some wisdom to the younger guys in the Brewers' organization.

"I get here real early, and we have activity in the cages. I tell them to ask me any questions. I tell them to play hard, play smart and they'll be fine."

The players are very appreciative of anything they can pick up from someone who is at where they one day hope to be. Nick Ramirez, who hit a walk-off single in the 10th inning to give Wisconsin a 5-4 win, said Gomez's mannerisms speak for themselves, and the young guys need to be like a sponge around a big league player.

"I was here last year when he was here," Ramirez said. "It's nice to have a guy with that kind of talent around. You just watch what they do. He's an established player in the big leagues, so it's nice to have him around here, watch how he gets his work in. Pick up on ... what he does. You can learn from anyone in baseball. It's nice to have him around."

Manager Matt Erickson thought Gomez was a little hesitant at first, being his first game back, but he saw some progress as the game went on.

"I thought he was a little bit timid at first," Erickson said. "[Gomez] said he felt good. If there was any pain, we'd probably get him out of there right away. He wanted to test [his hamstring] out and get a feel for it. Overall, at the end, he got into it a little more as the game went on, and he felt pretty good."

Gomez will be with Wisconsin Saturday, and is expected to return to Milwaukee to join the Brewers when he's eligible to come off the 15-day DL on Sunday.

Adam DeCock is a contributor to MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

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